Upcoming Events

Following Yale COVID-19 guidelines, the Whitney Humanities Center is closed for events until further notice. We are hosting virtual talks and other events throughout the semester; we hope you will join us.

Wednesday, November 04

Franke Lectures

Stephanie Smallwood, University of Washington

Centering the Transatlantic Slave Trade in the Critique of Capital

The Value of Marx’s Capital

Stephanie Smallwood is Associate Professor of History and Comparative History of Ideas at the University of Washington, Seattle, where she is also a faculty associate of the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies. Her research and teaching explore early modern histories of slavery, colonialism, and race, with particular emphasis on the transatlantic slave trade, racial capitalism, and African diasporas in the Americas. She is the author of Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from Africa to American Diaspora (2007), winner of the 2008 Frederick Douglass Prize awarded by Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. Her current project, “Africa in the Atlantic World: A Geopolitical History,” is concerned with the problematics of space in the intercontinental arena that scholars have come to call the “Atlantic world.” The project investigates the uneven spatial relations that shaped the Atlantic as a geopolitical domain and aims to produce a counternarrative of Atlantic history that puts the peoples of the African continent at its center.   
Please register in advance to receive the Zoom link
Poster

6:00pm

Wednesday, November 11

Franke Lectures

William Clare Roberts, McGill University

Science, Rhetoric, and Structure in Capital

The Value of Marx’s Capital

William Clare Roberts teaches political theory at McGill University. He is the author of Marx’s Inferno: The Political Theory of “Capital” (2018), which won the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize.
Please register in advance to receive the Zoom link

6:00pm

Thursday, November 12

Franke Lectures

Karen Ng, Vanderbilt University

Species-Being: In Defense of Humanistic Social Critique

The Value of Marx’s Capital

Karen Ng is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. She specializes in nineteenth-century German philosophy and Frankfurt School Critical Theory. She is the author of Hegel’s Concept of Life: Self-Consciousness, Freedom, Logic (2020).
Please register in advance to receive the Zoom link

6:00pm

Wednesday, November 18

Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism

Rebel Alliance in Algiers: The Band of Jews and Antisemites That Helped Turn the Tide in World War II

The Benjamin (Yale 1962) and Barbara Zucker Lecture Series
Ethan Katz, University of California, Berkeley
(Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism and Whitney Humanities Center)

The landing of American and British armies in North Africa on November 8, 1942, marked  one of the global turning points of World War II. What is little known is that the Allies’ path was smoothed by an insurrection in Algiers staged by an unlikely band of brothers: mostly Jewish shock troops, fighting to regain their lost citizenship, teamed with a number of French army officers and businessmen, most of whom were archconservative and even antisemitic. While recounting this riveting story, this talk also unlocks the mystery of an improbable short-term alliance with lasting implications. 
(Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism and Whitney Humanities Center)
Please register in advance to receive the Webinar link
Learn more
Poster

5:00pm

Wednesday, November 18

Franke Lectures

Babak Amini, London School of Economics

On the Receptions of Karl Marx’s Capital in the Anglophone World

The Value of Marx’s Capital

Babak Amini is a PhD candidate in sociology at the London School of Economics, researching on the “council democratic” movements in Germany and Italy in the World War I era. He is the coeditor (with Marcello Musto) of the forthcoming Routledge Handbook of Marx’s “Capital”: A Global History of Translation, Dissemination and Reception. He is also the coordinating assistant editor of the book series Marx, Engels, and Marxisms.
Please register in advance to receive the Zoom link

6:00pm

Wednesday, December 02

Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism

Grounds for Hope: Blacks, Jews, and the Future of Democracy

The Benjamin (Yale 1962) and Barbara Zucker Lecture Series
Terrence L. Johnson, Georgetown University
(Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism and Whitney Humanities Center)
Learn more

5:00pm, This talk will be on-line via Zoom. Details to follow.

Wednesday, December 02

Franke Lectures

Fred Moseley, Mount Holyoke College

Money and Capital in Volume 1 of Capital

The Value of Marx’s Capital

Fred Moseley is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Mount Holyoke College.  He has published extensively on Marxian theory and Marxian analysis of the US economy. His latest book is Money and Totality: A Macro-Monetary Interpretation of Marx’s Logic in “Capital” and the End of the Transformation Problem (2016). He also edited and wrote the introductions to the English translation of Marx’s Economic Manuscript of 1864–65  and to an excerpt from Marx’s Manuscript of 1867–68. He is a long-time member of the Union for Radical Political Economics and served as Program Director for URPE sessions at the Annual Convention of the American Economic Association from 2005 to 2015.
Please register in advance to receive the Zoom link

6:00pm

Wednesday, December 09

Franke Lectures

Cinzia Arruzza, New School for Social Research

Readings and Misreadings of Primitive Accumulation

The Value of Marx’s Capital

Cinzia Arruzza is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research. She works on ancient Greek philosophy and Marxist and feminist theory. She is the author of Dangerous Liaisons: The Marriages and Divorces of Marxism and Feminism (2013); Plotinus. Ennead II 5. On What Is Potentially and What Actually (2015); A Wolf in the City: Tyranny and the Tyrant in Plato’s Republic (2018); and coauthor of Feminism for the 99%: A Manifesto (2019).
Please register in advance to receive the Zoom link

6:00pm